Tag: work in progress

Let’s speed things up!

Multiple works in progress

One suggestion to working faster and looser is to on start multiple paintings at one time. I use the same paper size and color palette to work up four different versions. That way, I can just move from painting to painting, adding a little here and there, letting it evolve more naturally. Everything is a little less important or precious so I don’t get as frustrated when a painting isn’t working out. I just move on to the next one and come back later with a fresh perspective.

The importance of community

Communities final

What a great response I got last month for showing how I created the painting Women’s March (yes, I finally named it).  I thought I would give you another peek at the process of creating a recent painting titled Communities.  My concept was to illustrate the importance of the communities in our lives.
 
All of us are part of not one, but many communities. These communities might include our workmates, church group, country of origin, weekend soccer team, or book club friends. We often share common interests, goals, or beliefs. No one person has the same community as another, yet we each rely on and are strengthened by our bonds with our communities. Imagine what could be accomplished if we brought all our communities together to work for a common goal that benefitted all?

communities wip1

Step 1:  I started by incorporating some of the poured acrylic work that I’ve been exploring for the last six months.  I poured a half a dozen puddles of paint with a few drops of silicone mixed in onto a large canvas.  I tipped or spread (using a cake spatula) these poured paint mixtures.  When dry, I carved out ring and circle shapes by painting over these puddles with an acidic, olive color.

communities wip2Step 2:  I printed coordinating papers using my Gelli Plate.  I stamped and stenciled patterns on some of them and then cut out more ring and circle shapes.  I collaged them onto the canvas.

Step 3:  I added the large white areas by using a squeeze bottle of titanium white paint with Floetrol (a paint additive that helps paint flow more easily), creating these looping circles and large white areas.  I eliminated the orange ring as it was too distracting.

Communities final

 

Step 4:  The painting lacked a full range of values, and the shapes just seemed to float on the canvas.  So I added a darker green color to provide contrast and give the artwork a bit of weight at the bottom.

Step 5:  Needing more edginess, I flipped the painting 180º putting the most substantial area at the top.  This change created tension because the top elements now feel as though they might succumb to gravity at any moment.  I repeated the dark green color in other areas for balance and movement.  I added a very subtle dot pattern to the plain green background to break up this open space, then signed it.  C’est fini!